UK government scrambles to limit fallout from London fire

The British government on Sunday vowed to act on any recommendations from an inquest into the a fire that consumed a 24-story high-rise tower in the west of London and killed at least 58 people.

Trade Minister Greg Hands said the government is carrying out an "urgent inspection" of the roughly 2,500 similar tower blocks across Britain to assess their safety.

Public anger is mounting as residents and neighbors demand answers for how the blaze early Wednesday spread so quickly and trapped so numerous tower's 600-odd residents. British health authorities say that 19 fire survivors are still being treated at London hospitals, and 10 of them remain in critical condition.

Cladding used on Grenfell Tower blamed for spreading the blaze is banned in Britain, Philip Hammond has said.

Reports suggest that a renovation project on Grenfell Tower past year intentionally did not include safety devices such as sprinklers and doors created to keep the fire from spreading.

"My understanding is that the cladding that was reported wasn't in accordance with United Kingdom building regulations", Hands told Sky News.

The company behind the renovation also reportedly used banned, flammable cladding on the building's exterior to cut costs and make it more aesthetically attractive for neighbors in the Kensington and Chelsea borough, one of the UK's richest areas.

Labour Party lawmaker David Lammy said that the government and the police should immediately seize all documents relating to the building's renovation to prevent the destruction of evidence that could show criminal wrongdoing.

Asked if he felt guilty, the council leader said: 'I feel awful about the whole position we find ourselves in'.

He complained bitterly that a friend - the young artist Khadija Saye - was still alive three hours after the fire started but was unable to get out of her apartment to safety.

Number of global displaced up to record 65.6 million previous year
The number of people forced to flee has increased with more than 50% over the last five years, up from 42.3 million in 2012. In 2016, 22.5 million refugees fled their home country - the highest number since the agency was founded in 1950.

Police Commander Stuart Cundy said the number of 58 is based on reports from the public and may rise. He has not provided details about the inquiry.

The Grenfell Tower fire was a "preventable accident" caused by "years of neglect" by the local council and successive governments, Mayor of London Sadiq Khan has said.

Kensington Council said it would fully cooperate with the public inquiry.

They feel they have been ignored because they are poor, he said. Anger among residents has been mounting in recent days as information about the missing has been scanty and efforts to find temporary housing have faltered.

Prime Minister Theresa May met with victims of the disaster at Downing Street on Saturday, before declaring that the support given to families in the aftermath of the tragedy was "not good enough". She also says she will receive daily reports from the stricken neighborhood.

Asked what went wrong on the ground, he added: 'There is a gold command operation in place which brings together the emergency services, the local authorities, the voluntary organisations who can provide additional help.

The Home Office said it was "making arrangements" for the family of 23-year-old Syrian refugee Mohammad Alhajali - the first victim to be formally identified - to travel to the United Kingdom for his funeral.

The Home Office has assisted Alhajali's family in "making arrangements for their travel to the UK" from Syria, and more than 85,000 people have signed a petition calling for his parents to be granted visas so they can attend his funeral. He says it will take weeks or longer to recover and identify all the dead at the building.

Officials are using dental records, fingerprints and DNA samples to try and positively identify victims. Sixteen bodies have been taken to a mortuary for examination.

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